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Clinical Manual of Geriatric Psychiatry
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Clinical Manual of Geriatric Psychiatry

Edited by Mugdha E. Thakur, M.D., Dan G. Blazer, M.D., Ph.D., and David C. Steffens, M.D., M.H.S.
2014
314 pages
ISBN 978-1-58562-441-6
Paperback
Item #62441



Clinical Manual of Geriatric Psychiatry provides the most current information on psychiatric diagnoses seen in older patients in a concise format. Each chapter is broken into easily understandable, increasingly focused sections, and contains an extensive array of tables, references, and suggested readings. Chapters include clinically relevant information and evidence-based treatments for a wide range of topics and disorders:

  • The psychiatric interview of older adults, including history, family assessment, mental status examination, rating scales and standardized interviews, and effective communication techniques.
  • Psychopharmacology, including information on antidepressants, psychostimulants, antipsychotic medications, mood stabilizers, anxiolytics and sedative-hypnotics, and cognitive enhancers.
  • Diagnosis and treatment of delirium, dementia, mood disorders, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, sleep disorders, and substance use disorders, including coverage of definition, epidemiology, clinical features, risk factors, diagnosis and differential diagnosis, prevention and management, and treatment guidelines.
  • Individual and group psychotherapy strategies, including individual and group-based cognitive-behavioral therapies, interpersonal psychotherapies, relaxation training, cognitive stimulation therapy, and behavioral therapies.
  • Clinical psychiatry in the nursing home, with a focus on cognitive disorders and behavioral disturbances, depression, treatment progress in this setting, and relevant federal regulations.

Written by experts in geriatric psychiatry, this clinical manual provides a much-needed “field guide” for the care of nursing home patients and older adults. Busy clinicians, as well as researchers, residents, fellows, clinical psychologists, and social workers, will find this compact volume to be of the utmost value, as will anyone seeking to update their knowledge of geriatric psychiatry.

Preface. The psychiatric interview of older adults. Psychopharmacology. Delirium. Dementia and milder cognitive syndromes. Mood disorders. Schizophrenia and paranoid disorders. Anxiety disorders. Sleep and circadian rhythm disorders. Alcohol and drug problems. Individual and group psychotherapy. Clinical psychiatry in the nursing home. Index.
"This is a superb, clinically relevant, clear, and useful guide to the psychiatric care of the older patient. Its scope is comprehensive, addressing both assessment and evidence based interventions. It will be useful both to specialists in geriatric mental health, but even more importantly, to general mental health clinicians across disciplines (physicians, social workers, nurses, rehabilitation specialists, and pharmacists) and general medical clinicians who do the bulk of clinical work with older adults living with mental disorders. I would also recommend its use by family members desiring a greater understanding of the disorders that burden their loved ones, in order to make them better partners of the clinicians with whom they are working. Colleagues in the legal profession will also find the book illuminating, given the relevance of late life mental disorders to issues of competence for medical decision making and financial planning. All of us owe the authors a debt of gratitude for their ongoing efforts to bridge science and service."—Charles F. Reynolds III, M.D., UPMC Endowed Professor in Geriatric Psychiatry, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine

"The Clinical Manual of Geriatric Psychiatry was clearly written with the busy clinician in mind. It delivers the key elements of etiology, assessment and management of the older patient in a focused manner, yet also provides extensive referencing for the reader interested in pursuing the latest literature. This edition will be a valuable resource for both the established geriatrician as well as those who are new to the field."—Susan K. Schultz, M.D., Professor, University of Iowa College of Medicine

Carmen Andreescu, M.D.
John L. Beyer, M.D.
Dan G. Blazer, M.D., Ph.D.
Jack D. Edinger, Ph.D.
Dawn E. Epstein, B.S.
Li-Wen Huang, M.D.
Sharon K. Inouye, M.D., M.P.H.
Dilip V. Jeste, M.D.
Andrew D. Krystal, M.D., M.S.
Nicole M. Lanouette, M.D.
Eric J. Lenze, M.D.
Constantine G. Lyketsos, M.D., M.H.S.
Thomas R. Lynch, Ph.D.
Shahrzad Mavandadi, Ph.D.
Benoit H. Mulsant, M.D., M.S.
David W. Oslin, M.D.
Bruce G. Pollock, M.D., Ph.D.
Moria J. Smoski, Ph.D.
David C. Steffens, M.D., M.H.S.
Joel E. Streim, M.D.
Mugdha E. Thakur, M.D.
Ipsit V. Vahia, M.D.
Julie Loebach Wetherell, Ph.D.
William K. Wohlgemuth, Ph.D.
Mugdha E. Thakur, M.D., is Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina.

Dan G. Blazer, M.D., Ph.D., is JP Gibbons Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences; Professor of Community and Family Medicine, and Vice Chair of Academic Development at Duke University School of Medicine in Durham, North Carolina.

David C. Steffens, M.D., M.H.S., is Professor and Chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington, Connecticut.